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New Semester, New Students, New Projects

Getting back into the swing! Break is over and time to immerse yourself back into all things Design!

First Project – Cubed in 4 Parts

Introduction
In Design Foundations 1 and 2 you explored the conceptual and compositional possibilities of the elements and principles of design on a flat picture plane using illusory space. Now we’re moving into an exploration of forms in actual space. In this project you’ll be experimenting with variations in position, direction and finally, in shape. Please keep in mind that all three dimensional works are subject to gravity and that you must constantly consider this as an additional element in your designs.
Background Info
In Part One we’re going to explore DIRECTIONAL VARIATIONS. This means that the direction of the planes (here we’re referring to the 3 x 3 squares which are planes in 3-D space) can be varied in three different ways: rotation on a vertical axis, rotation on a horizontal axis and rotation on it’s own plane.
In Part Two we’re going to examine and apply DIRECTIONAL VARIATIONS and Gradual changes in the shape of the planes.
In Part Three we’re going to examine and apply DIRECTIONAL VARIATIONS and Gradual changes in the shape and SIZE of the planes.

Supplies
To begin this project you will need:
• Three 20 x 30 sheets of cardboard (plain, no color or printing please)
• Three 20 x 30 sheets of 1/8 inch thick foam core
• 18 x 24 inch drawing paper with presentation materials (foam core, tracing paper)
• An Exacto knife and LOTS of blades
• Tacky glue, white school glue or clear gel glue
• A ruler (cork backed slips less but is not required)
• White artist’s tape (not masking tape which is too sticky)
Sheet cardboard may be found at Denton Frame, Triangle A&E and at most mail supply stores or framing shops. Calling and pricing first will save you time and money. Other materials for this project may be purchased at Hobby Lobby, Michaels and Porch’s School Supply.

Getting Started
Step 1: Cut one sheet of cardboard down into 3 x 3 inch squares
do this precisely and carefully
Step 2: Cut four 9 x 9 squares out of the second sheet of cardboard
do this precisely and carefully
Step 3: Use the 9 x 9 squares as the base for your compositions
Step 4: Stack together enough 3 x 3 squares to form a cube
you’ll use one cube per part
Now that you’ve done the prep work we can begin to create some three-dimensional sketches using the cardboard as our pencil and sketch pad.
Assignment
PART ONE : DIRECTIONAL VARIATIONS
Using your pre-cut 3 x 3 inch squares create THREE unique and dynamic compositions that explore directional variations without changing the size or shape of the 3 x 3 inch squares. Use the 9 x 9 squares as the base for your compositions. These are your sketches so you may tape the squares to the base using the white artist’s tape. These 3-D sketches are what you’ll show for critique. Then, based on feedback and improvements, you’ll create one final comp of your best design for Part One that you
will turn in to be graded.
PART TWO : DIRECTIONAL VARIATIONS and Gradual changes in the shape of the planes
Using your pre-cut 3 x 3 inch squares create THREE unique and dynamic compositions that explore directional variations WHILE ALSO changing the SHAPE of the 3 x 3 inch squares (your biggest square will be 3 inches. For ease of work you’ll be reducing the other squares as needed). Use the 9 x 9 squares as the base for your compositions. These are your sketches so you may tape the squares to the base using the white artist’s tape. These 3-D sketches are what you’ll show for critique. Then, based on feedback and improvements, you’ll create one final comp of your best design for Part Two that you will turn in to be graded.
PART THREE : DIRECTIONAL VARIATIONS and Gradual changes in the shape and SIZE of the planes
Using your pre-cut 3 x 3 inch squares create THREE unique and dynamic compositions that explore directional variations WHILE ALSO changing the size and SHAPE of the 3 x 3 inch squares (your biggest square will be 3 inches. For ease of work you’ll be reducing the other squares as needed). Use the 9 x 9 squares as the base for your compositions. These are your sketches so you may tape the squares to the base using the white artist’s tape. These 3-D sketches are what you’ll show for critique.
Then, based on feedback and improvements, you’ll create one final comp in foam core of your best design for Part Three that you will turn in to be graded.Please note that you are only REQUIRED to create three sketches for each step but that the best solutions may REQUIRE further exploration on your part. Do not be easily satisfied, push yourself to find the strongest solution you can. This is an opportunity to be responsible for your own education…take it!
PART FOUR : THE DRAWN COMPOSITION
Draw your best solution from Parts 1-3 in a 3/4 view. This drawing should be ACCURATE in it’s use of perspective, tone and value ranges, illusion of mass, volume and depth. Pay attention to composition! Experiment with scale and cropping—don ’t just place the whole thing smac k dab in the center ! Live a little and try something new and exciting! Overall presentation size is 18” x 24” total. The piece will have a 2” border or frame making the overall drawing size 14” x 20.” Drawing must be matted or mounted and must be flapped with tracing paper.

Here are a few examples:

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